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Michigan

Local Resources

Stalking often occurs along with other crimes, like domestic violence and sexual assault. While there are no state coalitions for victims of stalking, many domestic violence and sexual assault programs are able to provide assistance. Many of the resources can be confusing to navigate, victim advocates are available to talk to you about protection orders, and your states criminal and civil stalking laws. Victim advocates can also assist you with safety planning, keeping a log of stalking incidents, and how to be safe when using technology. Find services and/or an advocate in your county using the following links:

Protection Orders

A protective order is a legal order issued by a state court that requires one person to stop harming and/or contacting another. Each state may have several types of protective orders: civil protective orders, criminal protective orders, or restraining orders, and they may have different names (for example, in Pennsylvania, there are “protection from abuse” orders). Some protective orders are specific to domestic and interfamilial violence, while others are broader, covering stalking, harassment, sexual assault, and other types of misconduct. An individual can get a protection order when the perpetrator is proven to have acted with intent to cause the victim emotional distress or fear for his/her safety, even when the perpetrator has not been charged or convicted. They permit the victim to call the police to have the abuser arrested if the abuser violates any part of the order.

Click here for more information on protection orders in Michigan.

Criminal Stalking Laws

Criminal stalking laws define when a perpetrator may be charged with the crime of stalking, and what infractions are required to bring such a charge. The laws usually define various misdemeanor and felony offenses that correlate with the severity of the transgression. Based on police investigation, a state prosecutor will determine what charges to bring against an offender, and will then file charges against the perpetrator (formally known as an indictment). A trial typically follows, and the defendant may be offered a plea agreement. The criminal statute will also delineate potential punishments, if the perpetrator is convicted, which may include probation, house arrest, and incarceration, among others. Restitution may be requested and awarded to the victim by court order following a conviction, usually at a sentencing hearing.

Click here for more information on criminal stalking laws in Michigan.

Civil Stalking Laws

Civil stalking laws allow victims of stalking to initiate a lawsuit to recover compensation from the perpetrator and any third party that may be responsible for the crime. In a civil lawsuit, there is no possibility of a criminal punishment; instead, the victim plaintiff is suing for actual harm (known as actual damages), punitive damages, attorney’s fees, and court costs. Civil statutes also often provide for victims to obtain protective orders against the perpetrator.

Click here for more information on civil stalking laws in Michigan.

National Resources

  • VictimConnect Resource Center - Confidential information, support and referrals for victims of crime via telephone, chat and text including safety planning and crime reporting.
  • WomensLaw.org - State-specific legal information related regarding protection orders, custody, divorce, state gun laws and more. WomensLaw.org also operates an email hotline where victims, their family/friends and advocates can write to ask legal questions.

Protection Orders

§ 600.2950a. Personal protection order restraining or enjoining individual from engaging in conduct prohibited under MCL 750.411h, 750.411i, or 750.411s; facts alleging stalking; conduct; respondent required to carry concealed weapon; omitting address of residence from documents; reasons for issuing or refusing to grant order; mutual order prohibited; effectiveness, issuance, contents, and duration of order; duties of court clerk; entering order into L.E.I.N.; service; notice to law enforcement agency; enforcement; refusal or failure to comply; false statement to court; purchase or possession of firearm; minor; issuance to prisoner prohibited; definitions.

(1) Except as provided in subsections (28), (29), and (31), by commencing an independent action to obtain relief under this section, by joining a claim to an action, or by filing a motion in an action in which the petitioner and the individual to be restrained or enjoined are parties, an individual may petition the family division of circuit court to enter a personal protection order to restrain or enjoin an individual from engaging in conduct that is prohibited under section 411h, 411i, or 411s of the Michigan penal code, 1931 PA 328, MCL 750.411h, 750.411i, and 750.411s. Relief under this subsection shall not be granted unless the petition alleges facts that constitute stalking as defined in section 411h or 411i, or conduct that is prohibited under section 411s, of the Michigan penal code, 1931 PA 328, MCL 750.411h, 750.411i, and 750.411s. Relief may be sought and granted under this subsection whether or not the individual to be restrained or enjoined has been charged or convicted under section 411h, 411i, or 411s of the Michigan penal code, 1931 PA 328, MCL 750.411h, 750.411i, and 750.411s, for the alleged violation.

(2) Except as provided in subsections (28), (29), and (31), by commencing an independent action to obtain relief under this section, by joining a claim to an action, or by filing a motion in an action in which the petitioner and the individual to be restrained or enjoined are parties, an individual may petition the family division of circuit court to enter a personal protection order to restrain or enjoin an individual from engaging in any of the following:

(a) One or more of the acts listed in subsection (3), if the respondent has been convicted of a sexual assault of the petitioner, or the respondent has been convicted of furnishing obscene material to the petitioner under section 142 of the Michigan penal code, 1931 PA 328, MCL 750.142, or a substantially similar law of the United States, another state, or a foreign country or tribal or military law. Relief under this subdivision shall be granted if the court determines that the respondent has been convicted of a sexual assault of the petitioner or that the respondent was convicted of furnishing obscene material to the petitioner under section 142 of the Michigan penal code, 1931 PA 328, MCL 750.142, or a substantially similar law of the United States, another state, or a foreign country or tribal or military law.

(b) One or more of the acts listed in subsection (3), if the petitioner has been subjected to, threatened with, or placed in reasonable apprehension of sexual assault by the individual to be enjoined. Relief under this subdivision shall not be granted unless the petition alleges facts that demonstrate that the respondent has perpetrated or threatened sexual assault against the petitioner. Evidence that a respondent has furnished obscene material to a minor petitioner shall constitute evidence that the respondent has threatened sexual assault against the petitioner. Relief may be sought and granted under this subdivision regardless of whether the individual to be restrained or enjoined has been charged with or convicted of sexual assault or an offense under section 142 of the Michigan penal code, 1931 PA 328, MCL 750.142, or a substantially similar law of the United States, another state, or a foreign country or tribal or military law.

(3) The court may restrain or enjoin an individual against whom a protection order is sought under subsection (2) from 1 or more of the following:

(a) Entering onto premises.

(b) Threatening to sexually assault, kill, or physically injure petitioner or a named individual.

(c) Purchasing or possessing a firearm.

(d) Interfering with the petitioner’s efforts to remove the petitioner’s children or personal property from premises that are solely owned or leased by the individual to be restrained or enjoined.

(e) Interfering with the petitioner at the petitioner’s place of employment or education or engaging in conduct that impairs the petitioner’s employment or educational relationship or environment.

(f) Following or appearing within the sight of the petitioner.

(g) Approaching or confronting the petitioner in a public place or on private property.

(h) Appearing at the petitioner’s workplace or residence.

(i) Entering onto or remaining on property owned, leased, or occupied by the petitioner.

(j) Contacting the petitioner by telephone.

(k) Sending mail or electronic communications to the petitioner.

(l) Placing an object on, or delivering an object to, property owned, leased, or occupied by the petitioner.

(m) Engaging in conduct that is prohibited under section 411s of the Michigan penal code, 1931 PA 328, MCL 750.411s.

(n) Any other specific act or conduct that imposes upon or interferes with personal liberty or that causes a reasonable apprehension of violence or sexual assault.

(4) Section 520j of the Michigan penal code, 1931 PA 328, MCL 750.520j, applies in any hearing on a petition for, a motion to modify or terminate, or an alleged violation of a personal protection order requested or issued under subsection (2), except as follows:

(a) The written motion and offer of proof shall be filed at least 24 hours before a hearing on a petition to issue a personal protection order or on an alleged violation of a personal protection order.

(b) The written motion and offer of proof shall be filed at the same time that a motion to modify or terminate a personal protection order is filed.

(5) If the respondent to a petition under this section is a person who is issued a license to carry a concealed weapon and is required to carry a weapon as a condition of his or her employment, a police officer certified by the commission on law enforcement standards act, 1965 PA 203, MCL 28.601 to 28.616, a sheriff, a deputy sheriff or a member of the Michigan department of state police, a local corrections officer, a department of corrections employee, or a federal law enforcement officer who carries a firearm during the normal course of his or her employment, the petitioner shall notify the court of the respondent’s occupation before the personal protection order is issued. This subsection does not apply to a petitioner who does not know the respondent’s occupation.

(6) A petitioner may omit his or her address of residence from documents filed with the court under this section. If a petitioner omits his or her address of residence, the petitioner shall provide the court a mailing address.

(7) If a court issues or refuses to issue a personal protection order, the court shall immediately state in writing the specific reasons for issuing or refusing to issue the personal protection order. If a hearing is held, the court shall also immediately state on the record the specific reasons for issuing or refusing to issue a personal protection order.

(8) A personal protection order shall not be made mutual. Correlative separate personal protection orders are prohibited unless both parties have properly petitioned the court under subsection (1) or (2).

(9) A personal protection order is effective and immediately enforceable anywhere in this state when signed by a judge. Upon service, a personal protection order also may be enforced by another state, an Indian tribe, or a territory of the United States.

(10) The court shall designate the law enforcement agency that is responsible for entering the personal protection order into the L.E.I.N.

(11) A personal protection order issued under this section shall include all of the following, to the extent practicable in a single form:

(a) A statement that the personal protection order has been entered to enjoin or restrain conduct listed in the order and that violation of the personal protection order will subject the individual restrained or enjoined to 1 or more of the following:

(i) If the respondent is 17 years of age or older, immediate arrest and the civil and criminal contempt powers of the court. If the respondent is found guilty of criminal contempt, he or she shall be imprisoned for not more than 93 days and may be fined not more than $500.00.

(ii) If the respondent is less than 17 years of age, immediate apprehension or being taken into custody and the dispositional alternatives listed in section 18 of chapter XIIA of the probate code of 1939, 1939 PA 288, MCL 712A.18.

(iii) If the respondent violates the personal protection order in a jurisdiction other than this state, the enforcement procedures and penalties of the state, Indian tribe, or United States territory under whose jurisdiction the violation occurred.

(b) A statement that the personal protection order is effective and immediately enforceable anywhere in this state when signed by a judge, and that upon service, a personal protection order also may be enforced by another state, an Indian tribe, or a territory of the United States.

(c) A statement listing each type of conduct enjoined.

(d) An expiration date stated clearly on the face of the order.

(e) A statement that the personal protection order is enforceable anywhere in Michigan by any law enforcement agency.

(f) The law enforcement agency designated by the court to enter the personal protection order into the L.E.I.N.

(g) For an ex parte order, a statement that the individual restrained or enjoined may file a motion to modify or rescind the personal protection order and request a hearing within 14 days after the individual restrained or enjoined is served or receives actual notice of the personal protection order and that motion forms and filing instructions are available from the clerk of the court.

(12) An ex parte personal protection order shall not be issued and effective without written or oral notice to the individual enjoined or his or her attorney unless it clearly appears from specific facts shown by verified complaint, written motion, or affidavit that immediate and irreparable injury, loss, or damage will result from the delay required to effectuate notice or that the notice will precipitate adverse action before a personal protection order can be issued.

(13) A personal protection order issued under subsection (12) is valid for not less than 182 days. The individual restrained or enjoined may file a motion to modify or rescind the personal protection order and request a hearing under the Michigan court rules. The motion to modify or rescind the personal protection order shall be filed within 14 days after the order is served or after the individual restrained or enjoined receives actual notice of the personal protection order unless good cause is shown for filing the motion after 14 days have elapsed.

(14) Except as otherwise provided in this subsection, the court shall schedule a hearing on the motion to modify or rescind the ex parte personal protection order within 14 days after the motion to modify or rescind is filed. If the respondent is a person described in subsection (5) and the personal protection order prohibits him or her from purchasing or possessing a firearm, the court shall schedule a hearing on the motion to modify or rescind the ex parte personal protection order within 5 days after the motion to modify or rescind is filed.

(15) The clerk of the court that issues a personal protection order shall do all of the following immediately upon issuance without requiring proof of service on the individual restrained or enjoined:

(a) File a true copy of the personal protection order with the law enforcement agency designated by the court in the personal protection order.

(b) Provide the petitioner with 2 or more true copies of the personal protection order.

(c) If the individual restrained or enjoined is identified in the pleadings as a law enforcement officer, notify the officer’s employing law enforcement agency of the existence of the personal protection order.

(d) If the personal protection order prohibits the individual restrained or enjoined from purchasing or possessing a firearm, notify the concealed weapon licensing board in the individual’s county of residence of the existence and content of the personal protection order.

(e) If the individual restrained or enjoined is identified in the pleadings as a department of corrections employee, notify the department of corrections of the existence of the personal protection order.

(f) If the individual restrained or enjoined is identified in the pleadings as a person who may have access to information concerning the petitioner or a child of the petitioner or individual and that information is contained in friend of the court records, notify the friend of the court for the county in which the information is located of the existence of the personal protection order.

(16) The clerk of a court that issues a personal protection order shall inform the petitioner that he or she may take a true copy of the personal protection order to the law enforcement agency designated by the court under subsection (10) to be immediately entered into the L.E.I.N.

(17) The law enforcement agency that receives a true copy of a personal protection order under subsection (15) or (16) shall immediately, without requiring proof of service, enter the personal protection order into the L.E.I.N.

(18) A personal protection order issued under this section shall be served personally, by registered or certified mail, return receipt requested, delivery restricted to the addressee at the last known address or addresses of the individual restrained or enjoined or by any other method allowed by the Michigan court rules. If the individual restrained or enjoined has not been served, a law enforcement officer or clerk of the court who knows that a personal protection order exists may, at any time, serve the individual restrained or enjoined with a true copy of the order or advise the individual restrained or enjoined of the existence of the personal protection order, the specific conduct enjoined, the penalties for violating the order, and where the individual restrained or enjoined may obtain a copy of the order. If the individual restrained or enjoined is less than 18 years of age, the parent, guardian, or custodian of the individual shall also be served personally or by registered or certified mail, return receipt requested, delivery restricted to the addressee at the last known address or addresses of the parent, guardian, or custodian. A proof of service or proof of oral notice shall be filed with the clerk of the court issuing the personal protection order. This subsection does not prohibit the immediate effectiveness of a personal protection order or immediate enforcement under subsection (21) or (22).

(19) The clerk of the court that issued a personal protection order shall immediately notify the law enforcement agency that received the personal protection order under subsection (15) or (16) if either or both of the following occur: 

(a) The clerk of the court receives proof that the individual restrained or enjoined has been served.

(b) The personal protection order is rescinded, modified, or extended by court order.

(20) The law enforcement agency that receives information under subsection (19) shall enter the information or cause the information to be entered into the L.E.I.N.

(21) Subject to subsection (22), a personal protection order is immediately enforceable anywhere in this state by any law enforcement agency that has received a true copy of the order, is shown a copy of it, or has verified its existence on the L.E.I.N.
 
(22) If the individual restrained or enjoined by a personal protection order has not been served, a law enforcement agency or officer responding to a call alleging a violation of the personal protection order shall serve the individual restrained or enjoined with a true copy of the order or advise the individual restrained or enjoined of the existence of the personal protection order, the specific conduct enjoined, the penalties for violating the order, and where the individual restrained or enjoined may obtain a copy of the order. The law enforcement officer shall enforce the personal protection order and immediately enter or cause to be entered into the L.E.I.N. that the individual restrained or enjoined has actual notice of the personal protection order. The law enforcement officer also shall file a proof of service or proof of oral notice with the clerk of the court that issued the personal protection order. If the individual restrained or enjoined has not received notice of the personal protection order, the individual restrained or enjoined shall be given an opportunity to comply with the personal protection order before the law enforcement officer makes a custodial arrest for violation of the personal protection order. Failure to immediately comply with the personal protection order is grounds for an immediate custodial arrest. This subsection does not preclude an arrest under section 15 or 15a of chapter IV of the code of criminal procedure, 1927 PA 175, MCL 764.15 and 764.15a, or a proceeding under section 14 of chapter XIIA of the probate code of 1939, 1939 PA 288, MCL 712A.14.
 
(23) An individual 17 years of age or older who refuses or fails to comply with a personal protection order issued under this section is subject to the criminal contempt powers of the court and, if found guilty of criminal contempt, shall be imprisoned for not more than 93 days and may be fined not more than $500.00. An individual less than 17 years of age who refuses or fails to comply with a personal protection order issued under this section is subject to the dispositional alternatives listed in section 18 of chapter XIIA of the probate code of 1939, 1939 PA 288, MCL 712A.18. The criminal penalty under this section may be imposed in addition to any penalty that may be imposed for any other criminal offense arising from the same conduct.
 
(24) An individual who knowingly and intentionally makes a false statement to a court in support of his or her petition for a personal protection order is subject to the contempt powers of the court.
 
(25) A personal protection order issued under this section is also enforceable under chapter XIIA of the probate code of 1939, 1939 PA 288, MCL 712A.1 to 712A.32, and section 15b of chapter IV of the code of criminal procedure, 1927 PA 175, MCL 764.15b.
 
(26) A personal protection order issued under this section may enjoin or restrain an individual from purchasing or possessing a firearm.
 
(27) A personal protection order issued under this section is also enforceable under chapter 17.
 
(28) A court shall not issue a personal protection order that restrains or enjoins conduct described in subsection (1) or (3) if any of the following apply:
 
(a) The respondent is the unemancipated minor child of the petitioner.
 
(b) The petitioner is the unemancipated minor child of the respondent.
 
(c) The respondent is a minor child less than 10 years of age.
 
(29) If the respondent is less than 18 years old, issuance of a personal protection order under this section is subject to chapter XIIA of the probate code of 1939, 1939 PA 288, MCL 712A.1 to 712A.32.

 

(30) A personal protection order issued before March 1, 1999 is not invalid on the ground that it does not comply with 1 or more of the requirements added by 1998 PA 476.

(31) A court shall not issue a personal protection order under this section if the petitioner is a prisoner. If a personal protection order is issued in violation of this subsection, a court shall rescind the personal protection order upon notification and verification that the petitioner is a prisoner.

(32) As used in this section:

(a) “Convicted” means 1 of the following:

(i) The subject of a judgment of conviction or a probation order entered in a court that has jurisdiction over criminal offenses, including a tribal court or a military court.

(ii) Assigned to youthful trainee status under sections 11 to 15 of chapter II of the code of criminal procedure, 1927 PA 175, MCL 762.11 to 762.15, if the individual’s status of youthful trainee is revoked and an adjudication of guilt is entered.

(iii) The subject of an order of disposition entered under section 18 of chapter XIIA of the probate code of 1939, 1939 PA 288, MCL 712A.18, that is open to the general public under section 28 of chapter XIIA of the probate code of 1939, 1939 PA 288, MCL 712A.28.

(iv) The subject of an order of disposition or other adjudication in a juvenile matter in another state or country.

(b) “Federal law enforcement officer” means an officer or agent employed by a law enforcement agency of the United States government whose primary responsibility is the enforcement of laws of the United States.

(c) “L.E.I.N.” means the law enforcement information network administered under the C.J.I.S. policy council act,1974 PA 163, MCL 28.211 to 28.215.

(d) “Personal protection order” means an injunctive order issued by the circuit court or the family division of circuit court restraining or enjoining conduct prohibited under subsection (1) or (3).

(e) “Prisoner” means a person subject to incarceration, detention, or admission to a prison who is accused of, convicted of, sentenced for, or adjudicated delinquent for violations of federal, state, or local law or the terms and conditions of parole, probation, pretrial release, or a diversionary program.

(f) “Sexual assault” means an act, attempted act, or conspiracy to engage in an act of criminal conduct as defined in section 520b, 520c, 520d, 520e, or 520g of the Michigan penal code, 1931 PA 328, MCL 750.520b, 750.520c, 750.520d, 750.520e, and 750.520g, or an offense under a law of the United States, another state, or a foreign country or tribal or military law that is substantially similar to an offense listed in this subdivision. 

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Criminal Stalking Laws

MCLS § 750.411h. Stalking; definitions; violation as misdemeanor; penalties; probation; conditions; evidence of continued conduct as rebuttable presumption; additional penalties. (1998)

(1)  As used in this section:

(a)  "Course of conduct" means a pattern of conduct composed of a series of 2 or more separate noncontinuous acts evidencing a continuity of purpose.

(b)  "Emotional distress" means significant mental suffering or distress that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.

(c)  "Harassment" means conduct directed toward a victim that includes, but is not limited to, repeated or continuing unconsented contact that would cause a reasonable individual to suffer emotional distress and that actually causes the victim to suffer emotional distress. Harassment does not include constitutionally protected activity or conduct that serves a legitimate purpose.

(d)  "Stalking" means a willful course of conduct involving repeated or continuing harassment of another individual that would cause a reasonable person to feel terrorized, frightened, intimidated, threatened, harassed, or molested and that actually causes the victim to feel terrorized, frightened, intimidated, threatened, harassed, or molested.

(e)   "Unconsented contact" means any contact with another individual that is initiated or continued without that individual's consent or in disregard of that individual's expressed desire that the contact be avoided or discontinued. Unconsented contact includes, but is not limited to, any of the following:

(i) Following or appearing within the sight of that individual.

(ii) Approaching or confronting that individual in a public place or on private property.

(iii) Appearing at that individual's workplace or residence.

(iv) Entering onto or remaining on property owned, leased, or occupied by that individual.

(v) Contacting that individual by telephone.

(vi) Sending mail or electronic communications to that individual.

(vii) Placing an object on, or delivering an object to, property owned, leased, or occupied by that individual.                           

(f)  "Victim" means an individual who is the target of a willful course of conduct involving repeated or continuing harassment.

(2)  An individual who engages in stalking is guilty of a crime as follows:

(a)  Except as provided in subdivision (b), a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 1 year or a fine of not more than $1,000.00, or both.

(b)  If the victim was less than 18 years of age at any time during the individual's course of conduct and the individual is 5 or more years older than the victim, a felony punishable by imprisonment for not more than 5 years or a fine of not more than $10,000.00, or both.

(3)  The court may place an individual convicted of violating this section on probation for a term of not more than 5 years. If a term of probation is ordered, the court may, in addition to any other lawful condition of probation, order the defendant to do any of the following:

(a)  Refrain from stalking any individual during the term of probation.

(b)  Refrain from having any contact with the victim of the offense.

(c)  Be evaluated to determine the need for psychiatric, psychological, or social counseling and if, determined appropriate by the court, to receive psychiatric, psychological, or social counseling at his or her own expense.

(4)  In a prosecution for a violation of this section, evidence that the defendant continued to engage in a course of conduct involving repeated unconsented contact with the victim after having been requested by the victim to discontinue the same or a different form of unconsented contact, and to refrain from any further unconsented contact with the victim, gives rise to a rebuttable presumption that the continuation of the course of conduct caused the victim to feel terrorized, frightened, intimidated, threatened, harassed, or molested.

(5)  A criminal penalty provided for under this section may be imposed in addition to any penalty that may be imposed for any other criminal offense arising from the same conduct or for any contempt of court arising from the same conduct.

MCLS § 750.411i. Definitions; aggravated stalking; circumstances; violation as felony; penalty; probation; additional conditions of probation; effect of continued course of conduct; rebuttable presumption; additional penalty. (1998)

(1)  As used in this section:

(a)  "Course of conduct" means a pattern of conduct composed of a series of 2 or more separate noncontinuous acts evidencing a continuity of purpose.

(b)  "Credible threat" means a threat to kill another individual or a threat to inflict physical injury upon another individual that is made in any manner or in any context that causes the individual hearing or receiving the threat to reasonably fear for his or her safety or the safety of another individual.

(c)  "Emotional distress" means significant mental suffering or distress that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.

(d)  "Harassment" means conduct directed toward a victim that includes, but is not limited to, repeated or continuing unconsented contact that would cause a reasonable individual to suffer emotional distress and that actually causes the victim to suffer emotional distress. Harassment does not include constitutionally protected activity or conduct that serves a legitimate purpose.

(e)  "Stalking" means a willful course of conduct involving repeated or continuing harassment of another individual that would cause a reasonable person to feel terrorized, frightened, intimidated, threatened, harassed, or molested and that actually causes the victim to feel terrorized, frightened, intimidated, threatened, harassed, or molested.

(f)  "Unconsented contact" means any contact with another individual that is initiated or continued without that individual's consent or in disregard of that individual's expressed desire that the contact be avoided or discontinued. Unconsented contact includes, but is not limited to, any of the following:

(i) Following or appearing within the sight of that individual.

(ii) Approaching or confronting that individual in a public place or on private property.

(iii) Appearing at that individual's workplace or residence.

(iv) Entering onto or remaining on property owned, leased, or occupied by that individual.

(v) Contacting that individual by telephone.

(vi) Sending mail or electronic communications to that individual.

(vii) Placing an object on, or delivering an object to, property owned, leased, or occupied by that individual.

(g)   "Victim" means an individual who is the target of a willful course of conduct involving repeated or continuing harassment.

(2)  An individual who engages in stalking is guilty of aggravated stalking if the violation involves any of the following circumstances:

(a)  At least 1 of the actions constituting the offense is in violation of a restraining order and the individual has received actual notice of that restraining order or at least 1 of the actions is in violation of an injunction or preliminary injunction.

(b)  At least 1 of the actions constituting the offense is in violation of a condition of probation, a condition of parole, a condition of pretrial release, or a condition of release on bond pending appeal.

(c)  The course of conduct includes the making of 1 or more credible threats against the victim, a member of the victim's family, or another individual living in the same household as the victim.

(d)  The individual has been previously convicted of a violation of this section or section 411h.

(3)  Aggravated stalking is a felony punishable as follows:

(a)  Except as provided in subdivision (b), by imprisonment for not more than 5 years or a fine of not more than $10,000.00, or both.

(b)  If the victim was less than 18 years of age at any time during the individual's course of conduct and the individual is 5 or more years older than the victim, by imprisonment for not more than 10 years or a fine of not more than $15,000.00, or both.

(4)  The court may place an individual convicted of violating this section on probation for any term of years, but not less than 5 years. If a term of probation is ordered, the court may, in addition to any other lawful condition of probation, order the defendant to do any of the following:

(a)  Refrain from stalking any individual during the term of probation.

(b)  Refrain from any contact with the victim of the offense.

(c)  Be evaluated to determine the need for psychiatric, psychological, or social counseling and, if determined appropriate by the court, to receive psychiatric, psychological, or social counseling at his or her own expense.

(5)  In a prosecution for a violation of this section, evidence that the defendant continued to engage in a course of conduct involving repeated unconsented contact with the victim after having been requested by the victim to discontinue the same or a different form of unconsented contact, and to refrain from any further unconsented contact with the victim, gives rise to a rebuttable presumption that the continuation of the course of conduct caused the victim to feel terrorized, frightened, intimidated, threatened, harassed, or molested.

(6)  A criminal penalty provided for under this section may be imposed in addition to any penalty that may be imposed for any other criminal offense arising from the same conduct or for contempt of court arising from the same conduct.

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Civil Stalking Laws

Michigan Comp. Laws Ann. § 600.2954. Maintaining civil action against individual engaging in prohibited conduct; victim defined. (1993)
(1) A victim may maintain a civil action against an individual who engages in conduct that is prohibited under section of the Michigan penal code, Act No. 328 of the Public Acts of 1931, being sections of the Michigan Compiled Laws, for damages incurred by the victim as a result of that conduct. A victim may also seek and be awarded exemplary damages, costs of the action, and reasonable attorney fees in an action brought under this section.

(2) A civil action may be maintained under subsection (1) whether or not the individual who is alleged to have engaged in conduct prohibited under section of Act No. 328 of the Public Acts of 1931 has been charged or convicted under section of Act No. 328 of the Public Acts of 1931 for the alleged violation.

(3) As used in this section, victim means that term as defined in section of Act No. 328 of the Public Acts of 1931.  

Michigan Comp. Laws Ann. § 750.411h. Stalking; definitions; violation as misdemeanor; penalties; probation; conditions; evidence of continued conduct as rebuttable presumption; additional penalties. (1998)
(1)  As used in this section:

(a)  "Course of conduct" means a pattern of conduct composed of a series of 2 or more separate noncontinuous acts evidencing a continuity of purpose.

(b)  "Emotional distress" means significant mental suffering or distress that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.

(c)  "Harassment" means conduct directed toward a victim that includes, but is not limited to, repeated or continuing unconsented contact that would cause a reasonable individual to suffer emotional distress and that actually causes the victim to suffer emotional distress. Harassment does not include constitutionally protected activity or conduct that serves a legitimate purpose.

(d) "Stalking" means a willful course of conduct involving repeated or continuing harassment of another individual that would cause a reasonable person to feel terrorized, frightened, intimidated, threatened, harassed, or molested and that actually causes the victim to feel terrorized, frightened, intimidated, threatened, harassed, or molested.

(e) "Unconsented contact" means any contact with another individual that is initiated or continued without that individual's consent or in disregard of that individual's expressed desire that the contact be avoided or discontinued. Unconsented contact includes, but is not limited to, any of the following:

(i) Following or appearing within the sight of that individual.

(ii) Approaching or confronting that individual in a public place or on private property.

(iii) Appearing at that individual's workplace or residence.

(iv) Entering onto or remaining on property owned, leased, or occupied by that individual.

(v) Contacting that individual by telephone.

(vi) Sending mail or electronic communications to that individual.

(vii) Placing an object on, or delivering an object to, property owned, leased, or occupied by that individual.

(f) "Victim" means an individual who is the target of a willful course of conduct involving repeated or continuing harassment.

(2) An individual who engages in stalking is guilty of a crime as follows:

(a) Except as provided in subdivision (b), a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 1 year or a fine of not more than $1,000.00, or both.

(b) If the victim was less than 18 years of age at any time during the individual's course of conduct and the individual is 5 or more years older than the victim, a felony punishable by imprisonment for not more than 5 years or a fine of not more than $10,000.00, or both.

(3) The court may place an individual convicted of violating this section on probation for a term of not more than 5 years. If a term of probation is ordered, the court may, in addition to any other lawful condition of probation, order the defendant to do any of the following:

(a) Refrain from stalking any individual during the term of probation.

(b) Refrain from having any contact with the victim of the offense.

(c) Be evaluated to determine the need for psychiatric, psychological, or social counseling and if, determined appropriate by the court, to receive psychiatric, psychological, or social counseling at his or her own expense.

(4) In a prosecution for a violation of this section, evidence that the defendant continued to engage in a course of conduct involving repeated unconsented contact with the victim after having been requested by the victim to discontinue the same or a different form of unconsented contact, and to refrain from any further unconsented contact with the victim, gives rise to a rebuttable presumption that the continuation of the course of conduct caused the victim to feel terrorized, frightened, intimidated, threatened, harassed, or molested.

(5) A criminal penalty provided for under this section may be imposed in addition to any penalty that may be imposed for any other criminal offense arising from the same conduct or for any contempt of court arising from the same conduct.

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