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Oregon

Local Resources

Stalking often occurs along with other crimes, like domestic violence and sexual assault. While there are no state coalitions for victims of stalking, many domestic violence and sexual assault programs are able to provide assistance. Many of the resources can be confusing to navigate, victim advocates are available to talk to you about address confidentiality, protection orders, and your states criminal and civil stalking laws. Victim advocates can also assist you with safety planning, keeping a log of stalking incidents, and how to be safe when using technology. Find services and/or an advocate in your county using the following links:

Address Confidentiality

Address confidentiality programs allow victims of stalking, sexual assault, domestic violence, or other types of crime to receive mail at a substitute address, which keeps their actual address private and prevents offenders from locating the victim through public records. Mail is sent to the legal substitute address, often a post office box, and then forwarded to the victim’s actual address. The substitute address can be provided whenever the victim’s address is required by a public agency.

Click here for more information on the Address Confidentiality Program in Oregon.

Protection Orders

A protective order is a legal order issued by a state court that requires one person to stop harming and/or contacting another. Each state may have several types of protective orders: civil protective orders, criminal protective orders, or restraining orders, and they may have different names (for example, in Pennsylvania, there are “protection from abuse” orders). Some protective orders are specific to domestic and interfamilial violence, while others are broader, covering stalking, harassment, sexual assault, and other types of misconduct. An individual can get a protection order when the perpetrator is proven to have acted with intent to cause the victim emotional distress or fear for his/her safety, even when the perpetrator has not been charged or convicted. They permit the victim to call the police to have the abuser arrested if the abuser violates any part of the order.

Click here for more information on protection orders in Oregon.

Criminal Stalking Laws

Criminal stalking laws define when a perpetrator may be charged with the crime of stalking, and what infractions are required to bring such a charge. The laws usually define various misdemeanor and felony offenses that correlate with the severity of the transgression. Based on police investigation, a state prosecutor will determine what charges to bring against an offender, and will then file charges against the perpetrator (formally known as an indictment). A trial typically follows, and the defendant may be offered a plea agreement. The criminal statute will also delineate potential punishments, if the perpetrator is convicted, which may include probation, house arrest, and incarceration, among others. Restitution may be requested and awarded to the victim by court order following a conviction, usually at a sentencing hearing.

Click here for more information on criminal stalking laws in Oregon.

Civil Stalking Laws

Civil stalking laws allow victims of stalking to initiate a lawsuit to recover compensation from the perpetrator and any third party that may be responsible for the crime. In a civil lawsuit, there is no possibility of a criminal punishment; instead, the victim plaintiff is suing for actual harm (known as actual damages), punitive damages, attorney’s fees, and court costs. Civil statutes also often provide for victims to obtain protective orders against the perpetrator.

Click here for more information on civil stalking laws in Oregon.

National Resources

  • VictimConnect Resource Center - Confidential information, support and referrals for victims of crime via telephone, chat and text including safety planning and crime reporting.
  • WomensLaw.org - State-specific legal information related regarding protection orders, custody, divorce, state gun laws and more. WomensLaw.org also operates an email hotline where victims, their family/friends and advocates can write to ask legal questions.

Address Confidentiality

The Oregon State Address Confidentiality Program assists crime victims who have relocated. Click here to find help with your application in your county. Click here to learn more about what the program in your state covers.

Contact Information

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Protection Orders

§30.866 Action for Issuance or Violation of Stalking Protective Order; Attorney Fees.

(1) A person may bring a civil action in a circuit court for a court's stalking protective order or for damages, or both, against a person if:

(a) The person intentionally, knowingly or recklessly engages in repeated and unwanted contact with the other person or a member of that person's immediate family or household thereby alarming or coercing the other person;

(b) It is objectively reasonable for a person in the victim's situation to have been alarmed or coerced by the contact; and

(c) The repeated and unwanted contact causes the victim reasonable apprehension regarding the personal safety of the victim or a member of the victim's immediate family or household

(2) At the time the petition is filed, the court, upon a finding of probable cause based on the allegations in the petition, shall enter a temporary court's stalking protective order that may include, but is not limited to, all contact listed in ORS 163.730. The petition and the temporary order shall be served upon the respondent with an order requiring the respondent to personally appear before the court to show cause why the temporary order should not be continued for an indefinite period. 

(3)

(a) At the hearing, whether or not the respondent appears, the court may continue the hearing for up to 30 days or may proceed to enter a court's stalking protective order and take other action as provided in ORS 163.738.

(b) If respondent fails to appear after being served as required by subsection (2) of this section, the court may issue a warrant of arrest as provided in ORS 133.110 in order to ensure the appearance of the respondent in court.

(4) The plaintiff may recover: 

(a) Both special and general damages, including damages for emotional distress;

(b) Punitive damages; and

(c) Reasonable attorney fees and costs.

(5) The court may enter an order under this section against a minor respondent without appointment of a guardian ad litem. 

(6) An action under this section must be commenced within two years of the conduct giving rise to the claim.

(7) Proof of the claim shall be by a preponderance of the evidence.

(8) The remedy provided by this section is in addition to any other remedy, civil or criminal, provided by law for the conduct giving rise to the claim.

(9) No filing fee, service fee or hearing fee shall be charged for a proceeding under this section if a court's stalking order is the only relief sought.

(10) If the respondent was provided notice and an opportunity to be heard, the court shall also include in the order, when appropriate, terms and findings sufficient under 18 U.S.C. 922 (d)(8) and (g)(8) to affect the respondent's ability to possess firearms and ammunition or engage in activities involving firearms.

(11) ORS 163.741 applies to protective orders issued under this section.

(12) Except for purposes of impeachment, a statement made by the respondent at a hearing under this section may not be used as evidence in a prosecution for stalking as defined in ORS 163.732 or for violating a court's stalking protective order as defined in ORS 163.750.

 

§163.741 Service of Stalking Protective Order; Entry of Order into Law Enforcement Data Systems.

(1) Service of a stalking protective order shall be made by personal delivery of a copy of the order to the respondent. The respondent need not be served if an order of the court indicates that the respondent appeared in person before the court.

(2) Whenever a stalking protective order, as authorized by ORS 163.735 or 163.738, is served on a respondent, the person serving the order shall immediately deliver to the county sheriff a true copy of the affidavit of proof of service, on which it is stated that personal service of the order was made on the respondent, and a copy of the order. If service of the order is not required under subsection (1) of this section, a copy of the order must be delivered to the sheriff by the court. Upon receipt of a copy of the order and notice of completion of any required service by a member of a law enforcement agency, the county sheriff shall immediately enter the order into the Law Enforcement Data System maintained by the Department of State Police and into the databases of the National Crime Information Center of the United States Department of Justice. If the order was served on the respondent by a person other than a member of a law enforcement agency, the county sheriff shall enter the order into the Law Enforcement Data System and databases of the National Crime Information Center upon receipt of a true copy of the affidavit of proof of service. The sheriff shall provide the complainant with a true copy of any required proof of service. Entry into the Law Enforcement Data System constitutes notice to all law enforcement agencies of the existence of the order. Law enforcement agencies shall establish procedures adequate to ensure that an officer at the scene of an alleged violation of the order may be informed of the existence and terms of the order. The order is fully enforceable in any county in this state.

(3) When a stalking protective order has been entered into the Law Enforcement Data System and the databases of the National Crime Information Center of the United States Department of Justice under subsection (1) of this section, a county sheriff shall cooperate with a request from a law enforcement agency from any other jurisdiction to verify the existence of the stalking protective order or to transmit a copy of the order to the requesting jurisdiction.

(4) When a stalking protective order is terminated by order of the court, the clerk of the court shall immediately deliver a copy of the termination order to the county sheriff with whom the original order was filed. Upon receipt of the termination order, the county sheriff shall promptly remove the original order from the Law Enforcement Data System and the databases of the National Crime Information Center of the United States Department of Justice.

 

§163.755 Conduct for which Stalking Protective Order may not be Issued.

(1) Nothing in ORS 30.866 or 163.730 to 163.750 shall be construed to permit the issuance of a court's stalking protective order under ORS 30.866 or 163.738, the issuance of a citation under ORS 163.735, a criminal prosecution under ORS 163.732 or a civil action under ORS 30.866:

(a) For conduct that is authorized or protected by the labor laws of this state or of the United States.

(b) By or on behalf of a person who is in the legal or physical custody of a law enforcement unit or is in custody under ORS chapter 419C.

(c) By or on behalf of a person not described in paragraph (b) of this subsection to or against another person who:

(A) Is a parole and probation officer or an officer, employee or agent of a law enforcement unit, a county juvenile department or the Oregon Youth Authority; and

(B) Is acting within the scope of the other person's official duties.

(2) As used in this section, "law enforcement unit" and "parole and probation officer" have the meanings given those terms in ORS 181.610.

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Criminal Stalking Laws

163.730.

As used in ORS 30.866 and 163.730 to 163.750, unless the context requires otherwise:

(1) "Alarm" means to cause apprehension or fear resulting from the perception of danger.

(2) "Coerce" means to restrain, compel or dominate by force or threat.

(3) "Contact" includes but is not limited to:

(a) Coming into the visual or physical presence of the other person;

(b) Following the other person;

(c) Waiting outside the home, property, place of work or school of the other person or of a member of that person's family or household;

(d) Sending or making written or electronic communications in any form to the other person;

(e) Speaking with the other person by any means;

(f) Communicating with the other person through a third person;

(g) Committing a crime against the other person;

(h) Communicating with a third person who has some relationship to the other person with the intent of affecting the third person's relationship with the other person;

(i) Communicating with business entities with the intent of affecting some right or interest of the other person;

(j) Damaging the other person's home, property, place of work, or school;

(k) Delivering directly or through a third person any object to the home, property, place of work, or school of the other person; or

(L) Service of process or other legal documents unless the other person is served as provided in ORCP 7 or 9.

(4) "Household member" means any person residing in the same residence as the victim.

(5) "Immediate family" means father, mother, child, sibling, spouse, grandparent, stepparent, and stepchild.

(6) "Law enforcement officer" means a person employed in this state as a police officer by:

(a) A county sheriff, constable, or marshal;

(b) A police department established by a university under ORS 352.383; or

(c) A municipal or state police agency.

(7) "Repeated" means two or more times.

(8) "School" means a public or private institution of learning or a child care facility.

Note: 163.730 to 163.753 were enacted into law by the Legislative Assembly but were not added to or made a part of ORS chapter 163 or any series therein by legislative action. See Preface to Oregon Revised Statutes for further explanation.

 

ORS § 163.732. Stalking. (1995)
(1) A person commits the crime of stalking if:

(a) The person knowingly alarms or coerces another person or a member of that person's immediate family or household by engaging in repeated and unwanted contact with the other person;

(b) It is objectively reasonable for a person in the victim's situation to have been alarmed or coerced by the contact; and

(c) The repeated and unwanted contact causes the victim reasonable apprehension regarding the personal safety of the victim or a member of the victim's immediate family or household.

(2)
(a) Stalking is a Class A misdemeanor.

(b) Notwithstanding paragraph (a) of this subsection, stalking is a Class C felony if the person has a prior conviction for:

(A) Stalking; or

(B) Violating a court's stalking protective order.

(c) When stalking is a Class C felony pursuant to paragraph (b) of this subsection, stalking shall be classified as a person felony and as crime category 8 of the sentencing guidelines grid of the Oregon Criminal Justice Commission.

ORS § 163.750.Violating court's stalking protective order. (1995)
(1) A person commits the crime of violating a court's stalking protective order when:

(a) The person has been served with a court's stalking protective order as provided in ORS 30.866 or 163.738 or if further service was waived underORS 163.741 because the person appeared before the court;

(b) The person, subsequent to the service of the order, has engaged intentionally, knowingly or recklessly in conduct prohibited by the order; and

(c) If the conduct is prohibited contact as defined in ORS 163.730 (3)(d), (e), (f), (h) or (i), the subsequent conduct has created reasonable apprehension regarding the personal safety of a person protected by the order.

(2)

(a) Violating a court's stalking protective order is a Class A misdemeanor.

(b) Notwithstanding paragraph (a) of this subsection, violating a court's stalking protective order is a Class C felony if the person has a prior conviction for:

(A) Stalking; or

(B) Violating a court's stalking protective order.

(c) When violating a court's stalking protective order is a Class C felony

pursuant to paragraph (b) of this subsection, violating a court's stalkingprotective order shall be classified as a person felony and as crime category 8 of the sentencing guidelines grid of the Oregon Criminal Justice Commission.

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Civil Stalking Laws

ORS § 30.866. Action for issuance or violation of stalking protective order; attorney fees. (2003)

(1)  A person may bring a civil action in a circuit court for a court's stalking protective order or for damages, or both, against a person if:

(a)  The person intentionally, knowingly or recklessly engages in repeated and unwanted contact with the other person or a member of that person's immediate family or household thereby alarming or coercing the other person;

(b)  It is objectively reasonable for a person in the victim's situation to have been alarmed or coerced by the contact; and

(c)  The repeated and unwanted contact causes the victim reasonable apprehension regarding the personal safety of the victim or a member of the victim's immediate family or household.

(2)  At the time the petition is filed, the court, upon a finding of probable cause based on the allegations in the petition, shall enter a temporary court's stalking protective order that may include, but is not limited to, all contact listed in ORS 163.730. The petition and the temporary order shall be served upon the respondent with an order requiring the respondent to personally appear before the court to show cause why the temporary order should not be continued for an indefinite period.

(3)

(a) At the hearing, whether or not the respondent appears, the court may continue the hearing for up to 30 days or may proceed to enter a court's stalking protective order and take other action as provided in ORS 163.738.

(b) If respondent fails to appear after being served as required by subsection (2) of this section, the court may issue a warrant of arrest as provided in ORS 133.110 in order to ensure the appearance of the respondent in court.

(4)  The plaintiff may recover:

(a)  Both special and general damages, including damages for emotional distress;

(b)  Punitive damages; and

(c)  Reasonable attorney fees and costs.

(5)  The court may enter an order under this section against a minor respondent without appointment of a guardian ad litem.

(6) An action under this section must be commenced within two years of the conduct giving rise to the claim.

(7)    Proof of the claim shall be by a preponderance of the evidence.

(8) The remedy provided by this section is in addition to any other remedy, civil or criminal, provided by law for the conduct giving rise to the claim.

(9) No filing fee, service fee or hearing fee shall be charged for a proceeding under this section if a court's stalking  order is the only relief sought

(10) If the respondent was provided notice and an opportunity to be heard, the court shall also include in the order, when appropriate, terms and findings sufficient under 18 U.S.C. 922 (d)(8) and (g)(8) to affect the respondent's ability to possess firearms and ammunition or engage in activities involving firearms.

(11) ORS 163.741 applies to protective orders issued under this section.

(12) Except for purposes of impeachment, a statement made by the respondent at a hearing under this section may not be used as evidence in a prosecution for stalking as defined in ORS 163.732 or for violating a court's stalking protective order as defined in ORS 163.750.

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